Women participation in politics and governance

  • Preliminary report (as of September 2013) of the May 2013 automated national and local elections shows that around 19.97 percent (3,503) of the elected posts, including ARMM elections, are won by women candidates, higher than the 18.4 percent turnout in 2010.

  • The number of women who filed candidacy for the election period was only 7,925 or 17.83 percent of the total number of candidates.

     2013 National and Local Election

     2010 National Election

  • There were 8 women who ran out of 33 senatorial candidates (24.2%), of which 4 entered the top 12 winning senators (33.3%). Women participation in the 2010 senatorial election was slightly lower at 23.0 percent (14 out of 61 senatorial candidates) with two women elected (16.7%).

  • There are 60 women Representatives (party-list not included) elected in the 16th Congress (2013 National and Local Election). They accounted for 25.6 percent of the total 234 Representatives as members of the Lower House. During the 15th Congress, 65 women (22.5%) had secured memberships in the House of Representatives.

  • There are 18 (22.5%) women Provincial Governors and 11 (13.8%) women Vice Governors as well as 332 (20.9%) women City/Municipal Mayors and 265 (16.7%) women Vice Mayors.

  • Voter turnout, which is computed by dividing the total votes cast by the total number of registered voters, is higher for women than men.

  • COMELEC figures as of September 2013 show that women voter turnout is 77.9 percent compared to men at 77.0 percent. The national figure is 77.2 percent.

  • In the May 2010 automated national and local elections voter turnout is also higher for women than men. Voter turnout for women is 75.7 percent compared to men at 74.4 percent. The national figure is 75.0 percent.

  • In 2007 and 2004, voter turnouts for women were also higher than men and the national figures. Women voter turnout in 2007 was 73.3 percent while that of men was 72.8 percent and the national figure at 73.1 percent. In 2004, women voter turnout was 77.5 percent compared to men at 76.4 percent while the national figure was 76.9 percent.
  • In 2010 Senatorial election, there were 14 women who ran out of 61 candidates (23.0%), of which two entered the top 12 winning senators (16.7%). Women participation in the senatorial election in 2007 was lower at 10.8 percent (4 out of 37 senatorial candidates) with one woman elected (8.3%).

     2007 - 2010

  • There are 65 women Representatives elected in the 15th Congress (2010 national election). They accounted for 22.5 percent of the total 289 Representatives as members of the Lower House. During the 14th Congress, 51 women had secured memberships in the House of Representatives.

     2001 - 2011

  • A women’s rights organization has secured party-list representation in Congress since 2004. Civil society/private sector organizations that carry the agenda of marginalized sectors vie for a limited number of seats in the House of Representatives.

     2001-2005

  • In the 2010 national election, a total of 56 Party-list Representatives were given seats in the House of Congress, two represented a women’s organization – Gabriela Women’s Party (GWP) which also won in the 2007 and 2004 national elections.

  • Of the total 56 elected Party-list Representatives in 2010, 14 (25%) are women. In 2007 election, 6 out of 21 Pary-List Representatives were women (28.6%), while in 2004, 4 out of 23 elected Party-list Representatives (17.4%) were women.

  • The participation of women in the judiciary is slightly increasing. In 2007, 32 percent of the total incumbent judges in the first and second level courts, including Shari’a courts, were women, although it increased to 33 percent in 2008; 33 percent in 2009; and 34 percent in 2010.

  • In the Supreme Court, 20% of 15 justices in 2001 were women; 27% in 2002; 29% in 2003; 33% in 2004; 36% both in 2005 and 2006; 43% in 2007; 36% in 2008; 15% in 2009; and 21% both in 2010 and 2011.

  • Statistics on women lawyers showed a decreasing trend of disparity from its male counterpart. In 2001, the percentage of women bar passers was 40.44 percent (512).

  • It decreased in 2002 at 39.04 percent (358) but increased in 2003, 2004, and 2005 at 43.68 percent (484), 46.31 percent (765), and 48.27 percent (724) respectively.

  • Women dominate the bureaucracy especially the technical or second-level. Based on the 2004 data of the Civil Service Commission, women make up the majority of the bureaucracy, accounting for 58.7 percent of the total 1.31 million government personnel.

  • As of January 2014, the percentage of women occupying CES positions (3rd level positions) is 42 percent – one percent below from last year’s report.

  • Women in the bureaucracy are likely to be technical personnel and men are likely to be clerks or managers/executives.

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